Shigechiyo Izumi

Shigechiyo Izumi (泉 重千代 Izumi Shigechiyo, 1880 (or June 29, 1865) – February 21, 1986) was a Japanese centenarian who was titled the oldest living person after the death of Niwa Kawamoto, also from Japan. His case was first verified by Guinness World Records, who titled him the oldest man ever, but Guinness have in recent years backed away from their previous statement; in the Guinness World Records Book 2012, Christian Mortensen is titled “the oldest verified man ever”, and Izumi is not mentioned.

Continue reading

Jeanne Calment

Jeanne Louise Calment 21 February 1875 – 4 August 1997), was a French supercentenarian who had the longest confirmed human lifespan in history, living to the age of 122 years, 164 days. She lived in Arles, France, for her entire life, outliving both her daughter and grandson by several decades. Calment became especially well known from the age of 113, when the centenary of Vincent van Gogh’s visit brought reporters to Arles. She entered the Guinness Book of Records in 1988, Calment became the last living documented person born in the 1870s when the Japanese supercentenarian Tane Ikai (born 1879) died on 12 July 1995, and was thenceforth more than five and a half years older than any other living human being until her death over two years later. In total she outlived 329 undisputedly verified supercentenarians. Her lifespan has been thoroughly documented by scientific study. More records have been produced to verify her age than in any other case.

Continue reading

Sarah Knauss

Knauss lived her entire life in Pennsylvania. She was born to Walter and Amelia Clark in the small short-lived coal-mining town of Hollywood and died in Allentown. In 1901, she married Abraham Lincoln Knauss (December 19, 1878 – March 1, 1965). She was a skilled seamstress, and made her own wedding dress, in addition to making tablecloths and her own clothes. She reportedly learned to sew when she was 4 years old. Sarah, who was 28 when Henry Ford introduced the Ford Model T in 1908, lived through seven U.S. wars and 23 U.S. Presidents. She was 31 at the time of the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912, and was 46 when Charles Lindbergh flew solo across the Atlantic.

Continue reading